Sunday, 18 November 2018

An open letter from an 85 year old Gordon constituent to her MP Colin Clark


 
Dear Mr Clark,

I write to complain about what feels like treachery by our Prime Minister for allowing such a poor deal on Brexit even to be considered as acceptable to the British population.

I spent the first 5 years of my life in Jersey, daughter of a non-Jersey born clergyman. It was only by the grace of God, or maybe more accurately the decision of the Bishop of Winchester who offered my father a living near Bournemouth, which saved him from being sent to a Nazi concentration camp. 

A search light camp was established adjacent to our vicarage – later bombed. During the war we had evacuees and after the war we gave refuge to starving children from the Netherlands.


As a child I followed D Day and the liberation of France, Belgium and the Netherlands by the British Army, Navy and Airforce and lived through the years of shortage which followed. Now Theresa May is willing to accept a deal that imprisons us by the very people we liberated from the Germans. Why are the EU’s negotiators so anxious to punish us who seek freedom when we helped them in their time of need? Have they forgotten that we sent food and lost many people and suffered much damage so that they might be free?

Recently we have gone through a shared reflection on the First World War. Yet as the print on the so called “Brexit Agreement” dries, another period of domination by the EU looms large against the British. How can Theresa May be so blind and so arrogant to allow the EU to inflict this upon those of us who went through so much when we were young.

A war child now 85 years old.

13 comments:

  1. This son of a D-Day veteran will agree with the 85 year old daughter of a minister as well. Mrs May has inadvertently fallen into an EU trap. The EU hs now proven itself to be the Fourth Reich.

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    1. And this son and grandson of men who served in the Crown Forces (not that my question would be any the less valid were this not the case) respectfully asks you, Grame, firstly to define what you mean by that last sentence, and then, secondly, to substantiate your assertion.

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    2. My apologies, Graeme, for inadvertently miss-spelling your name.

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    3. Graeme?
      I know I'm not the only one looking forward to your courteous elucidation.

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    4. As Graeme has not provided any explanation for a statement that is, literally, non-sense, we may conclude that it is no longer operative.

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  2. Your letter is all true and I remember all the people
    .Who were bombed out of their house and home staying with us.I don't like the E.U any more they are bullies and seem to be following Hitler's dream of running the whole of Europe and we .are important to that dream

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  3. Think of all the time you have wasted Running Man. I've just deleted dozens of your comments. Go away or I will turn off the comments so no-one can comment.

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  4. My uncle's service took him to many places. Two which left the greatest impression on him were Southampton and Hamburg. They had in common acres and acres of rubble, and the smell of the dead still lingering in the air.

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  5. The two main organizations derived from the need to prevent a fifth general conflict have been the Council of Europe and the European Union. Amongst their fundamental premises are the inviolability of human rights, the integrity of state frontiers, the Rule of Law, and respect for sovereignty. They have maintained their resilience, as was earnestly hoped, despite the ending of the Cold War.

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  6. As Alain Minc was pointing out nearly thirty years ago, the emerging Europe's main weakness was its lack of institutional coherence. Since all the power was held by the individual Member States, who for the most part preferred to continue making decisions behind closed doors in protracted discussions, sometimes those decisions could take inordinately long. Moreover, since the EU civil service (of some 30,000 personnel), headed by the Commission, was under the control of the Member States, there was a deleterious lack of direct accountability. Certain parties (especially those of the Right) and certain Governments (including that of the UK) preferred this state of affairs, which made it possible to promote a given measure and then divert any hostile reaction onto a certain scapegoat called 'Europe'. These parties and Governments have set their faces like flint against any move to make the Commission accountable to the European Parliament.

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  7. Many adverse consequences have flowed, and continue to flow, from this representative deficit.

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